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Biography

Jessica Hische is a lettering artist, illustrator, author, and self-described “avid internetter” working in San Francisco and Brooklyn. After graduating with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Design from Tyler School of Art (Temple University) in 2006, she worked for Headcase Design in Philadelphia before taking a position as Senior Designer at Louise Fili Ltd. In 2009, after two and a half years, Jessica left to further her freelance career and embark on several fun personal projects. Jessica began Daily Drop Cap, a project in which every day she created a new illustrative letter, working through the alphabet a total of twelve times. The popularity of Daily Drop Cap really kickstarted her career as a letterer, and has inspired many other designers to start daily lettering projects. Daily Drop Cap concluded in 2011, but you can find the letters in all sorts of places, from postcard sets to iPhone cases.

Jessica has become as well known for her side projects as she has for her client work. While she doesn’t consider herself a web designer, many of her personal projects are web-centric. She’s created several educational micro-sites including Mom This is How Twitter Works, Should I Work for Free? and Don’t Fear the Internet (a collaborative project with Russ Maschmeyer).

She coined the term “procrastiworking” to describe her tendency to procrastinate on client work by working on personal projects.

Jessica is actively involved in the design, illustration, and type communities (serving on the Type Directors Club board from 2012 to 2015) and is a prolific public speaker, appearing at colleges and conferences worldwide. She and her studio mate Erik Marinovich also host lettering workshops and events (though infrequently) at their San Francisco studio Title Case.

Jessica’s clients includes Wes Anderson, The United States Postal Service, Tiffany & Co., The New York Times, Penguin Books, Target, Starbucks, American Express, and Wired Magazine. She has also released several commercial typefaces which are available in her store. Jessica has been named a Print Magazine New Visual Artist (20 under 30), one of Forbes 30 under 30 in Art and Design, an ADC Young Gun, and a “Person to Watch” by GD USA. She’s been personally profiled in many magazines including Eye Magazine (UK), Communication Arts, Grafik Magazine (UK), and Novum Magazine (Germany). Her first book, In Progress, is available through Chronicle Books.

Jessica Hische is a lettering artist, illustrator, author, and self-described “avid internetter” working in San Francisco and Brooklyn. After graduating with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Design from Tyler School of Art, she worked for Headcase Design in Philadelphia before taking a position as Senior Designer at Louise Fili Ltd. While working for Louise, Jessica also maintained a busy freelance career and in 2009, after two and a half years of little sleep and a lot of lettering, she left to further her freelance career and embark on several personal projects.

Jessica has become as well known for her side projects as she has for her client work. While she doesn’t consider herself a web designer, many of her personal projects are web-centric. Her project Daily Drop Cap, is probably the reason you first stumbled across Jessica’s work, and she’s created several educational micro-sites including Mom This is How Twitter Works, Should I Work for Free? and Don’t Fear the Internet (a collaborative project with Russ Maschmeyer).

She is actively involved in the design, illustration, and type communities (serving on the Type Directors Club board from 2012 to 2015) and is a prolific public speaker, appearing at colleges and conferences worldwide.

Jessica’s clients includes Wes Anderson, Tiffany & Co., The United States Postal Service, The New York Times, Penguin Books, Target, Starbucks, and Wired Magazine. She’s been named a Print Magazine New Visual Artist (20 under 30), one of Forbes 30 under 30 in Art and Design two years in a row, an ADC Young Gun, and a “Person to Watch” by GD USA. Her first book, In Progress, is available through Chronicle Books.

Jessica Hische is a lettering artist and author working in San Francisco and Brooklyn. She has had the pleasure of working for clients like Wes Anderson, The United States Postal Service, The New York Times, and Penguin Books and her work has been featured again and again in design and illustration annuals both in the US and internationally. She’s been named a Print Magazine New Visual Artist (20 under 30), one of Forbes 30 under 30 in Art and Design two years in a row, an ADC Young Gun, and a “Person to Watch” by GD USA. Aside from her illustrious client work, she has created numerous side projects including Daily Drop Cap, Should I Work for Free?, Mom This is How Twitter Works, and Don’t Fear the Internet (created along with Russ Maschmeyer), and has traveled the world speaking at conferences about her work and ideas. Her first book, In Progress, is available through Chronicle Books.

Jessica Hische is a crazy cat lady known for her lettering, silly projects, and occasional foul mouth.

Press Photos

  • Photograph by John Madere

  • Photographs by Peter 0’Dwyer for Goddess Guide

  • Left: Photograph by Michael O’Neal / Right: Photograph by Kari Orvik

Photographs featured were shot by professional photographers and must be used with appropriate credits. To use these images in a magazine or book, email the photographer to discuss usage and inquire about higher resolution artwork. The photos by John Madere, Michael O'Neal, and Kari Orvik are free to use on any blog and in any magazine or other publication. Michael’s portraits are 1000px wide and should be large enough for most online formats.

Work Image Use

If you are writing an article about me, you are free to use images of my work on your blog. If you want to use images of my work editorially with articles NOT about me, you must license individual images. To request high res images for magazine articles or books please gather low res jpgs of the pieces you are requesting (10 images or less) and submit them to me as a zipped file so that I can gather these images.